The College of Optometrists

Resolving complaints

C119
You must give a helpful and honest response to anyone who complains about the services you have provided. 233
C120
If a patient complains about the treatment they have received they have a right for their complaint to be heard and dealt with in a sensitive and timely manner. Doing so can help avoid the complaint escalating unnecessarily.
C121
You should always take the complaints of children and young people seriously. You should help them in their complaint if their rights or interests have been denied or abused, if they are unhappy with the care they have received or because they have been denied care.
C122
You should not discriminate against a patient who has complained. You should continue to treat them with respect and courtesy.
C123
You should aim to resolve informal complaints at the time they are made, within the practice. If the complaint is formal you should:
  • send the patient a written acknowledgement within three days of receiving their complaint and explain how the complaint will be handled, with timeframes234
  • tell the patient if you cannot keep to the timeframe and why234
  • give the patient a named individual with whom they can liaise234
  • try to contact the patient verbally to discuss their concerns234
  • ask the patient what they want as an outcome234
  • offer the patient a face-to-face meeting to discuss their concerns. You should agree to a request by the patient to have someone with them at the meeting234
  • avoid being defensive when dealing with complaints
  • keep the patient informed about the progress in dealing with their complaint
  • deal with all the points raised in a complaint
  • offer an apology, where appropriate. Giving an apology does not mean you are admitting responsibility, it is a way of showing concern and understanding
  • if the patient’s complaint is justified, offer a fair solution, which may include offering to put things right at your own expense if you have made a mistake. At the end of your investigation, write to the patient explaining:
    • what you have decided
    • any practical solutions you can offer
    • whether you are going to make any changes to your practice as a result
  • if the patient wishes to take the complaint further, tell the patient that they can complain to the General Optical Council (GOC) or the Optical Consumer Complaints Service (OCCS).
C124
You must keep records of the complaint, and relevant documents. This would include details of oral and written communication between you and the patient and a chronology of the investigation process. Any internal documents should be objective and non-judgemental.234

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